Entertainment

‘Molly-Mae is a wolf in sheep’s clothing – but she’s not the only Thatcherite influencer’ – Liam Gilliver


The Love Island villa will become a Tory hotspot for the talentless to get rich and sweatshop workers to hustle harder if Molly-Mae Hague’s comments are anything to go by, writes Liam Gilliver

"What Molly-Mae really means is - the more you are willing to exploit someone, the richer you can be"
“What Molly-Mae really means is – the more you are willing to exploit someone, the richer you can be”

Molly-Mae Hague rose to fame during her stint on Love Island – where she worked really hard to numb the nation’s brains with her hetero banter and mundane taste in men who all look the same.

But after leaving the villa – donned in an outfit stained with the sweat of an exploited teenager living hundreds of miles away – Molly-Mae secured a slew of lucrative deals.

In fact, according to reports, the star was earning a staggering £11,000 a week between August 2019 and August 2020, all thanks to partnerships from brands such as PrettyLittleThing.

Fast-forward a year later and Molly-Mae announces she has become the creative director of PLT – after selling her soul for a seven-figure deal.







Molly-Mae Hague has sparked fury by saying everyone has ‘the same 24 hours in a day’
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She was accused of being tone-deaf and not recognising her own privilege
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From then onwards, the influencer was often draped in £37,0000 Cartier Bracelets and Prada’s Mono Combat Boots (the one people fork out £1,100 for to show people they can afford Prada).

And with her new-found style – we’ll call it ‘Look at me, I’m rich’ – Molly-Mae also found a startling discovery.

Buried in physics books and peer-reviewed journals, the filler-free celeb shook the science world with one simple yet groundbreaking sentence.

“We all have the same 24 hours in a day”.

Of course, you’ll probably know that Molly-Mae was actually talking about people who live in poverty, who aren’t handed seven-figure deals or gifted gold and diamonds, who have to show up to the food bank after working at the hospital all day to feed their kids. You know, lazy people.

“‘You’re given one life and it’s down to you what you do with it. You can literally go in any direction,” Guru Hague said.

“When I’ve spoken about that in the past I have been slammed a little bit, with people saying, ‘it’s easy for you to say that because you’ve not grown up in poverty, so for you to sit there and say we all have the same 24 hours in a day is not correct.’ But, technically, what I’m saying is correct. We do.”

Molly-Mae then said she understood that some people are poor – but that “if you want something enough you can achieve it”.

Within seconds of making the comment, the internet exploded. People saw that Molly-Mae is a wolf in sheep’s clothing; someone who makes her millions by running a company that has been accused of modern day slavery, which pays their staff pennies.






Molly-Mae said she knew people wouldn’t like her remarks before she said them

What Molly-Mae really means is – the more you are willing to exploit someone, the richer you can be. But Molly-Mae isn’t the only out-of-touch influencer.

We have created a society that gives a platform to these over-privileged and under-educated people. We have given Molly-Mae and all the other Instagram celebs the tools they need to accrue insane levels of wealth.

It happened a long time ago. Remember when Zoella sold 12-year-old girls a £50 advent calendar for Christmas? Or when Made In Chelsea star Toff claimed on First Dates that her parents had never given her anything on a plate (guessing private school doesn’t count).

The Love Island villa will become a Tory hotspot for the talentless to get rich and sweatshop workers to hustle harder – where Thatcherites with fake tan and fillers start thinking people actually care about their political and social ideals.

So please don’t allow Molly-Mae and all the other influencers to make more money. Stop buying from their ethically empty companies and aspiring to become them.

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